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IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: Generation Gap
 



These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop (http://www.internetwritingworkshop.org/).

Prepared by: Carter Jefferson
Posted on: April 1, 2007
Reposted on: January 4, 2009
Reposted on: June 6, 2010
Reposted on: March 18, 2012
Reposted on: March 16, 2014
Reposted on: March 17, 2017

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Exercise: In 400 words or less, write a scene involving two characters related to one another by birth or marriage, one more than 75 years old, the other at least 25 years younger.

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The characters may be almost anyone: mother and daughter,  grandfather and granddaughter, first cousins or siblings, uncle and nephew, even wife and husband. Don't tell us their ages--let them show us.

The setting may be a family residence, a nursing home, a golf course, a kitchen, a prison, anywhere.   They may be meeting after a long separation, or they may live  together and associate with each other daily. See if you can give us an idea of their previous attitudes toward each other--loving, hostile, or something else--and explore the emotions generated during this meeting.

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Exercise: In 400 words or less, write a scene involving two characters related to one another by birth or marriage, one more than 75 years old, the other at least 25 years younger.

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Critique: Do the characters ring true? Does their dialogue seem  lifelike? Is the scene properly set? Consider all aspects of the  writing.


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Modified by Gayle Surrette.