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IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: Lighten up! (Version 2)

These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop (http://www.internetwritingwor kshop.org/).

Prepared by: Margery Casares
Posted on: Mon, 5 Mar 2001
Reposted on: Sun, 28 Mar 2004
Reposted on: Mon, 4 Jul 2005
Reposted, revised, on: Sun, 21 Oct 2007
Reposted on: Sun, 5 Apr 2009
Reposted on: Sun, 20 Oct 2013
Reposted on: Sun, 4 Sep 2016

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Exercise: Write a scene in 400 words or less in which light--dim or
bright, colored or white--plays a part.

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In many scenes in stories of all sorts light is not even mentioned--it's
taken for granted. But light can affect characters and action. Light has
color, character, and motion, and it affects the scene, even if
characters never think of it. It can create a mood or lead to a
discovery; it creates shadows that may hide something important.

Show the light. Remember that your description must reflect the scene
and mood you wish to create. Light may not be the main factor
present; it may be merely a part of the setting. Still, it has an effect,
so make sure that effect is apparent.

-------------------------

Exercise: Write a scene in 400 words or less in which light--dim or
bright, colored or white--plays a part.

-------------------------

In your critiques, tell the writer whether the use of light in the
submission is effective in creating atmosphere or showing the
influence of light on characters.  As always, comment on the general
quality of the writing.


Web site created by Rhéal Nadeau and the administrators of the Internet Writing Workshop.
Modified by Gayle Surrette.