?
General info:
Home
Joining
Rules 
How it works
Participation
Too Many Emails?
Formatting
Listserv Settings
Contact Us

Critiquing Lists:
Fiction
Lovestory
Nonfiction
Novels
Poetry
Practice
Script-writing
Child/Young adult

Discussion Lists:
Writing
MarketChat
SFChat

The IWW Blog Writing Advice

Other Topics:
FAQ
LINKS
Our administrators
Other writing lists
Books on writing
IWW History
Showcase of Successes


IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: Lights Out! (v. 3)

These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop (http://www.internetwritingworkshop.org/).

Prepared by: Rhéal Nadeau
Posted on: Sun, 21 November 2004
Revised, reposted by Patricia Johnson on: Sun, 20 November 2005
Revised, reposted on: Sun, 2 November 2008
Revised, reposted on: Sun, 14 February 2010
Reposted on: Sun, 26 June 2011
Reposted on: Sun, 22 July 2012
Reposted on: Sun, 9 November 2014
Reposted on: Sun, 19 June 2016
___________________

Exercise: In 400 words or less, write a scene in which the character(s) can't see, and show the experiences via the other senses.
Whether by blindness, darkness, or some other cause, the character(s) cannot utilize the sense of sight.
 __________________

Involving all the senses is a powerful tool to liven up our writing and draw in the reader. Too often, however, writers limit themselves to visual descriptions and dialogue. This yields a world with no taste, no smell, no texture.

One way to explore the senses is to imagine what things would be like without them. How would your character(s) perceive the world without the ability to see? Use the other senses: smell, taste, touch, hearing. Show the experience, don't just narrate it.
 _________________

Exercise: In 400 words or less, write a scene in which the character(s) can't see, and show the experiences via the other senses.
Whether by blindness, darkness, or some other cause, the character(s) cannot utilize the sense of sight.
__________________

When critiquing, mention specifics about how the story addressed the absence of vision. Was the story's approach unique and believable? Were the absence of vision and the presence of the other senses successful within the story or not. Why, or why not?


Web site created by Rhéal Nadeau and the administrators of the Internet Writing Workshop.
Modified by Gayle Surrette.