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IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: Sayings (Version 5)

These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop (http://www.internetwritingworkshop.org/).

Prepared by: Florence Cardinal
Posted on: Sun, 16 Sep 2001
Revised, reposted on: June 11, 2006
Revised, reposted on: September 23, 2007
Revised, reposted on: November 16, 2008
Revised, reposted on: March 21, 2010
Reposted on: November 6, 2011
Reposted on: December 7, 2013


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Exercise: In less than 400 words, write a scene to illustrate the point of a folk saying or adage. End with the saying so that we will know what you are showing us.

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We've all heard the old sayings, like the ones from Aesop's fables or maybe from the Bible. Things like slow and steady wins the race, do unto others as you would have them do unto you, or still waters run deep. Most of these adages stem from a story or a parable that illustrates the saying.

If you want examples of more of these sayings, you'll find a lot of Aesop's fables
here: http://www.aesopfables.com/  Or Shakespeare here:
http://www.enotes.com/shakespeare-quotes/

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Exercise: In less than 400 words, write a scene to illustrate the point of a folk saying or adage. End with the saying so that we will know what you are showing us.

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In critiquing the work submitted for this exercise, tell the author why or why not the piece satisfies the requirements of the exercise and what worked and what didn't. Be sure to tell why it didn't work.


Web site created by Rhéal Nadeau and the administrators of the Internet Writing Workshop.
Modified by Gayle Surrette.