?
General info:
Home
Joining
Rules 
How it works
Participation
Too Many Emails?
Formatting
Listserv Settings
Contact Us

Critiquing Lists:
Fiction
Lovestory
Nonfiction
Novels
Poetry
Practice
Script-writing
Child/Young adult

Discussion Lists:
Writing
MarketChat
SFChat

The IWW Blog Writing Advice

Other Topics:
FAQ
LINKS
Our administrators
Other writing lists
Books on writing
IWW History
Showcase of Successes


IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: Insert Humor Here

These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop(http://www.internetwritingworkshop.org/).

Prepared by: Charles Hightower
Posted on: 18 December 2011
Posted on: 24 February 2013
Posted on: 6 March 2014
Posted on: 11 October 2015
-------------------------

Exercise: In 400 words or less, paint an intense scene intermixed with a bit of humor.

-------------------------

When a writer - or a filmmaker for that matter - builds up to an intense scene of action or suspense, it can prove effective to lighten the mood with a bit of humor. Let the reader catch his / her breath before you ratchet the tension to still higher levels.

Who has seen the movie The Terminator that doesn't remember the line, "I'll be back," spoken by Schwarzenegger moments before he returns to reduce a police station to rubble? What about Bruce Willis in Die Hard, who offers this comment as a car is being riddled with bullets, stories below: "Welcome to the party, pal."

You might have a wise-cracking police officer at a bloody crime scene, a glass of spilled water during a salary review, a narcoleptic bus driver fending off rush hour lunatics. Build the tension, and then provide a release valve for the reader.

-------------------------

Exercise: In 400 words or less, paint an intense scene intermixed with a bit of humor.

-------------------------

In your critique, consider whether the humor comes across as authentic. Would you want to read more of the tale?


Web site created by Rhéal Nadeau and the administrators of the Internet Writing Workshop.
Modified by Gayle Surrette.