?
General info:
Home
Joining
Rules 
How it works
Participation
Too Many Emails?
Formatting
Listserv Settings
Contact Us

Critiquing Lists:
Fiction
Lovestory
Nonfiction
Novels
Poetry
Practice
Script-writing
Child/Young adult

Discussion Lists:
Writing
MarketChat
SFChat

The IWW Blog Writing Advice

Other Topics:
FAQ
LINKS
Our administrators
Other writing lists
Books on writing
IWW History
Showcase of Successes


IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: Alien Encounter

These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop(http://www.internetwritingworkshop.org/).

Prepared by: Charles Hightower
Posted on: 4 March 2012
Reposted on: 26 May 2013
Reposted on: 3 August 2014
Reposted on: 10 July 2016
Reposted on: 23 July 2017

-------------------------

In 400 words or less, create a scene where your character encounters something completely outside his or her frame of reference. The experience may force the character to reevaluate prior beliefs or assumptions.

-------------------------

Imagine how your character might feel upon encountering a 10-foot Kodiak bear face-to-face. A young child meeting someone with a severe medical condition, or watching an unusual animal for the first time. Someone's response to an initial view of the Grand Canyon. A hunter's first kill. A soldier's first taste of battle. A mortician's assistant on the first day of employment.

Help us to feel the character's range of emotions in assimilating the new experience: wonder, awe, fear, amusement, disgust, what have you.

-------------------------

In 400 words or less, create a scene where your character encounters something completely outside his or her frame of reference. The experience may force the character to reevaluate prior beliefs or assumptions.

-------------------------

In your critique, tell the author whether the description was such that you could visualize the scene and experience the character's emotions. If the scene fell short, be sure to tell the author what could be improved.


Web site created by Rhéal Nadeau and the administrators of the Internet Writing Workshop.
Modified by Gayle Surrette.