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IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: Buyer's Remorse

These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop(http://www.internetwritingworkshop.org/).

Prepared by: Alice Folkart
Posted on: Sun, December 9, 2012
Reposted on: Sun, July 12, 2015
Reposted on: Sun, August 21, 2016
Reposted on: Sun, October 15, 2017

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Exercise: In 400 words or less sketch a character who has just bought something and is now thinking better of it.

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A single mom who has signed for a mortgage on a house may find that the neighborhood is less than ideal for her kids. Or a child could trade a beloved plaything for a friend’s action character and then realize that he doesn't really care about the new toy. A woman might buy a Persian rug that proves to be not only an over-priced fake, but also is infested with fleas.

We know something about your central character by what he or she buys and the emotions attached to that acquisition, but we know even more when we see into their feelings of remorse or regret. How could I have been so dumb? What made me do it? What now?

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Exercise: In 400 words or less sketch a character who has just bought something and is now thinking better of it.

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In your critique, consider whether the author has shown what has motivated the character to acquire something and why the character regrets having done so. Is the character sympathetic or not, and how does the author show us? And of course, do speak up about the mechanics and craft of the writing.


Web site created by Rhéal Nadeau and the administrators of the Internet Writing Workshop.
Modified by Gayle Surrette.