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IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: Science into Fiction


These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop (http://www.internetwritingworkshop.org/).

Prepared by: Charles Hightower
Posted on: 8 May 2016

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Exercise: For this exercise, introduce a scientific discovery or technological
adva ncement, and construct around it, a fictional work of no more
than 400 words. Your readers should be able to understand the
idea of your "science", without being weighed down by details.

Consider showing conflict, as that can drive an interesting tale. What
might happen if an invention could control this area of science? And
what if that control fell into unworthy hands?

-------------------------

You might start with a recent discovery / advancement found on a science
website, or create one of your own.

As an example, scientists gained new understanding of how one form of
bacteria can freeze water, though the surrounding temperature is above
freezing.

What if an invention could make use of that discovery / advancement? See
what kind of story you can develop from just five to ten minutes of
research.

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Exercise: For this exercise, introduce a scientific discovery or technological
adva ncement, and construct around it, a fictional work of no more
than 400 words. Your readers should be able to understand the
idea of your "science", without being weighed down by details.

Consider showing conflict, as that can drive an interesting tale. What
might happen if an invention could control this area of science? And
what if that control fell into unworthy hands?

-------------------------

Critique: Did you understand the writer's science or technology? Did
its explanation flow well with the overall piece? Did the writing draw you
in? Would you have wanted to read more?



Web site created by Rhéal Nadeau and the administrators of the Internet Writing Workshop.
Modified by Gayle Surrette.