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IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: A Word to the Wise


These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop (http://www.internetwritingworkshop.org/).

Prepared by Kathy Highcove
Posted on: June 26, 2016

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In 400 words or less, create a scene in which a character feels
compelled to give advice to another character. Whether the advice is
warranted or wanted, a kindly suggestion or an aggrieved complaint is
up to you, the author. Whatever the reason for the private word, show
us why someone felt the need to address the issue. Then make clear
how the counsel is received.

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The inspiration for your story might come from many sources: personal
experience, social media, a family discussion, a business conference,
or perhaps an overheard conversation. Remember that dialogue is the
key element of this assignment. Each character’s conversation should
reveal his/her mind set and personality.

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In 400 words or less, create a scene in which a character feels
compelled to give advice to another character. Whether the advice is
warranted or wanted, a kindly suggestion or an aggrieved complaint is
up to you, the author. Whatever the reason for the private word, show
us why someone felt the need to address the issue. Then make clear
how the counsel is received.

-------------------------

Your critique: Did you find the conversation believable? Was the
adviser’s argument effective? Did you think that he/she was tactful,
timid, or too tough on the listener? Could you foresee the outcome of
the conversation? Did you identify with either the speaker or the
listener?


Web site created by Rhéal Nadeau and the administrators of the Internet Writing Workshop.
Modified by Gayle Surrette.