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IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: Agree to Disagree

These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop (http://www.internetwritingworkshop.org/).

Proposed by Evelyn Ellis
Posted on Sunday, November 5, 2017




Exercise: It seems these days that people have lost the art to conduct a
rational discussion. Too often, it is he or she who shouts loudest and talks
over the other speaker who appears to win the day.

In 400 words or less, show us two or more people with
different viewpoints discussing an issue.

__________________________________

For example, you might choose a political or social hot topic, a
disturbing or controversial person in the news, etc. Keep the
discussion polite, and have both parties support their arguments
through reasoned thought. At the end of the discussion, it may
be that their positions remain unchanged. Alternatively, one of
them may begin to see the other persons point of view.

The two people could be strangers in a caf or bar, family members,
colleagues or school class mates, etc.

__________________________________

Exercise: It seems these days that people have lost the art to conduct a
rational discussion. Too often, it is he or she who shouts loudest and talks
over the other speaker who appears to win the day.

In 400 words or less, show us two or more people with
different viewpoints discussing an issue.

__________________________________

Critiquing: Does the writer enable you to see both sides of the
debate clearly? Is the language reasoned, and does each give
the other time to posit their views? Do the participants listen to one
another? Or does one or both appear to be merely considering
their next stream of words?


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