?
General info:
Home
Joining
Rules 
How it works
Participation
Too Many Emails?
Formatting
Listserv Settings
Contact Us

Critiquing Lists:
Fiction
Lovestory
Nonfiction
Novels
Poetry
Practice
Script-writing
Child/Young adult

Discussion Lists:
Writing
MarketChat
SFChat

The IWW Blog Writing Advice

Other Topics:
FAQ
LINKS
Our administrators
Other writing lists
Books on writing
IWW History
Showcase of Successes


IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: The Power of Persuasion (Version 2)

These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop (http://www.internetwritingworkshop.org/).

Prepared by Ruth Douillette
Posted: Sunday, February 17, 2008
Reposted: Sunday, May 5, 2013
Revised and Reposted: Sunday, Feb 28, 2016

-------------------------

Exercise: In 400 words or less, write a scene in which a character tries to change another person's mind or actions.   

-------------------------

Draw inspiration for your story from your own experiences. Think about the many times you’ve been asked to take another look at a situation, and act or react in a different way. Who tried to persuade you? A political or religious leader? A parent or child? A celebrity or orator? A teacher or physician? A crook or a confidant? How were you wheedled, bullied, nagged, urged, flattered, praised, insulted or tricked into a contemptible or commendable act? If you were the petitioner, how did you sway your listener? Use real life experiences as source material for this week’s fictional story.

-------------------------

Exercise: In 400 words or less, write a scene in which a character tries to change another person's mind or actions.

-------------------------

To Critique: Note if the conflict is clear and understandable. Did the persuader’s words and phrases work effectively to persuade the listener? Did the character's reactions show his or her inner struggle? Tell the author what you liked or didn’t like about the scene. Give concrete examples. Please continue to include your email address in your critique.

 


Web site created by Rhéal Nadeau and the administrators of the Internet Writing Workshop.
Modified by Gayle Surrette.