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IWW Practice-W Exercise Archives
Exercise: Writing Funny

These exercises were written by IWW members and administrators to provide structured practice opportunities for its members. You are welcome to use them for practice as well. Please mention that you found them at the Internet Writers Workshop (http://www.internetwritingworkshop.org/).

Prepared by: Wayne Scheer
Posted on: Sunday, December 31, 2017



In 400 words or less, tell us a story fictional or nonfictional -
using humor to enliven your narrative.

__________________________________

Humor can be used to help relieve or even underscore pain. Of course,
writing a funny story for personal satisfaction is also an honorable
goal. Either way, a well-placed joke or humorous action can spice up
a story and create a bond between writers and their audience. But a
lame joke, or one that is clearly in poor taste, will usually have the
opposite effect on a reader or listener.

The story for this exercise is up to you, the writer. Whether you
choose a slice of life piece, a detective story, a romance, or even a
horror story a variety of genres might be enhanced with humor.

__________________________________

In 400 words or less, tell us a story fictional or nonfictional -
using humor to enliven your narrative.

__________________________________

When critiquing the story, decide if you found the story amusing. Was
the humor well-placed or overdone? Was the levity appropriate to the
situation or did it seem forced? Finally, did the jokes help you
identify with the character? Why or why not? Would you look forward
to reading more of this authors material?


Web site created by Rhal Nadeau and the administrators of the Internet Writing Workshop.
Modified by Greg Gunther.